doooooooooooomed

llama-o-rama:

greenpeacesemester:

Check out the latest blog from Greenpeace Semester recruiter Alexa Markley. If you’re interested in joining us this summer for the Semester, apply today and train with Greenpeace for five weeks in DC! 

hey that’s me! and this is my class as bears in New Mexico: 

GOT Spring SF

we loved it a lot and I bet you would too.

Yes! If you’d like to meet people who may or may not want to pose on rocks as bears, and learn how to become a leader for the environment, apply TODAY to be part of one of the 2013 Semester training programs. 

Shortly after the BP oil spill, Greenpeace activists skimmed some crude off of the Gulf and used it to tag one of Shell’s exploratory ships with the phrase “Arctic Next?” - a clever and poetic action designed to call attention to Shell’s arctic drilling plans.

And 2 years later, while Shell is continuing to explore for new places to do the same kind of offshore drilling that resulted in the BP spill - balls of tar and crude oil from that disaster are still washing up on the beaches of the Gulf coast.

A spill like the Deepwater Horizon would devastate the pristine arctic region and be nearly impossible to clean-up.  Shell has yet to provide an adequate response plan for a disaster of this kind.  Fortunately, we still have time to do something.

You can take action now to stop this from happening again.  Send a message to Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and tell him not to give Shell more time to drill in the Arctic.

Greenpeace activists, including Greenpeace Semester alumni Basil Tsimoyianis, continue their protest of arctic oil drilling around the Gazprom rig, as the New York Times and The Guardian report on today’s record ice shrinkage and it’s relation to climate change - which is the only reason the arctic is now drillable in the first place.
You can show your support for these brave activists by reblogging this, and getting their story out as it unfolds on Twitter with #Stopgazprom and #SavetheArctic.

Greenpeace activists, including Greenpeace Semester alumni Basil Tsimoyianis, continue their protest of arctic oil drilling around the Gazprom rig, as the New York Times and The Guardian report on today’s record ice shrinkage and it’s relation to climate change - which is the only reason the arctic is now drillable in the first place.

You can show your support for these brave activists by reblogging this, and getting their story out as it unfolds on Twitter with #Stopgazprom and #SavetheArctic.

justanothergryffindor
We know how you feel Mr. Seal…
Stand tall with Greenpeace and legions of A-List Celebrities who are calling for an Arctic Sanctuary that will prevent companies like Shell from drilling in deep arctic regions, which will make global warming worse and put beautiful arctic wildlife like seals at risk.  Read more about our campaign at www.savethearctic.org.
neaq:

How hot was it?
From BostonGlobe.com (Photo: David Ryan/Boston Globe)
“At the New England Aquarium, it was so hot that the seals outside got fishicles, which are just what they sound like. Officials there also reported that their penguins were considering taking off their tuxedos.”

We know how you feel Mr. Seal…

Stand tall with Greenpeace and legions of A-List Celebrities who are calling for an Arctic Sanctuary that will prevent companies like Shell from drilling in deep arctic regions, which will make global warming worse and put beautiful arctic wildlife like seals at risk.  Read more about our campaign at www.savethearctic.org.

neaq:

How hot was it?

From BostonGlobe.com (Photo: David Ryan/Boston Globe)

“At the New England Aquarium, it was so hot that the seals outside got fishicles, which are just what they sound like. Officials there also reported that their penguins were considering taking off their tuxedos.”

Today is the first day of Summer Session 1!

Students will be discussing Greenpeace History, learning about our current priority campaigns, touring the office space with legendary Greenpeace staffer Bill Richardson, drawing life maps and creating a vision gallery to imagine a greener and more peaceful world!

"Hug the Monster"

“It may seem impossible to imagine that a technologically advanced society could choose, in essence, to destroy itself, but that is what we are now in the process of doing.”

Just read this interesting article on climate rhetoric on Think Progress.

Climate scientists have been consistently downplaying and underestimating the risks for three main reasons. First, their models tended to ignore the  myriad amplifying carbon cycle feedbacks that we now know are kicking in (such as the defrosting tundra).

Second, they never imagined that the nations of the world would completely ignore their warnings, that we would knowingly choose catastrophe. So until recently they hardly ever seriously considered or modeled the do-nothing scenario, which is a tripling (820 ppm) or quadrupling (1100 ppm) of preindustrial levels of carbon dioxide over the next hundred years or so. In the last 2 or 3 years, however, the literature in this area has exploded and the picture it paints is not pretty (see “An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Global Warming Impacts: How We Know Inaction Is the Gravest Threat Humanity Faces“).

Third, as Blakemore (and others) have noted, the overwhelming majority of climate scientists are generally reticent and cautious in stating results — all the more so in this case out of the mistaken fear that an accurate diagnosis would somehow make action less likely. Yes, it’d be like a doctor telling a two-pack-a-day patient with early-stage emphysema that their cough is really not that big a deal, but would they please quit smoking anyway. We live in a world, however, where anyone who tries to explain what the science suggests is likely to happen if we keep doing nothing is attacked as an alarmist by conservatives, disinformers, and their enablers in the media.